Education


By Katie Kelly
for The Limerick Post

LIMERICK PA – Historical societies have become valuable venues to learn about an area’s history, and the Spring-Ford Area Historical Society – a non-profit organization that provides local historical information to the public – is a similarly trusted resource, its members say.

An antique cash register that once was used in the Hotel Freed is on display at the Spring-Ford Area Historical Society in Royersford

An Oct. 28, 1958, open house gathered future society members together at what was then the Royersford PA train station. Several area residents brought collections of items and pieces from around the area to display. Its first officers were subsequently elected Nov.  13 of the same year; Lee Warner was installed as the president. Meetings were held monthly in a community room at Phoenix Savings and Loan.

It wasn’t until May 1988 that a grand opening of the society’s museum was held at the train station.  It subsequently moved, once in 1995 and again in May 2000, to its current location at 526 Main St., Royersford.

Editor’s Note: The Post thanks Spring-Ford High School student Katie Kelly for this bit of Limerick (PA) Township history. Katie aspires to be a writer and journalist; her mother, Beth, is a well-known photographer and marketing expert. Together they are producing historical notes for The Post, which are published on Wednesdays.

Photo by Beth Studt

By Katie Kelly
for The Limerick Post

ROYERSFORD PA – Education in the Royersford and Spring City areas has changed greatly over the years.

In the 1800s all education was private. In Spring City, the first public school was located in the Lyceum Building on Main and Hall Streets. In 1849 the school was moved to the Union Meeting House. It would be moved again to another building until the Church Street School was created in 1872. It was enlarged 20 years later so it could fit all 12 grades. A new high school on New Street opened in 1929 and the Church Street School closed.

The Royersford Public Library building was once a grade school.

In 1830 in Royersford, a new grade school on at Fourth and Washington Street was built. Today it is the Royersford Public Library.

It wasn’t until the fall of 1931 until the new Royersford High School for juniors and seniors was put in place. Currently, it is used to educate the eighth graders of the Spring-Ford School District.

Editor’s Note: The Post thanks Spring-Ford High School student Katie Kelly for this bit of Limerick (PA) Township history. Katie aspires to be a writer and journalist; her mother, Beth, is a well-known photographer and marketing expert. Together they are producing historical notes for The Post, which are published on Wednesdays.

Photo by Beth Studt

Deserted buildings at Frick's Lock.

By Katie Kelly
for The Limerick Post

FRICK’S LOCK PA – Frick’s Lock is a deserted village in East Coventry Township. It consists of about 10 abandoned buildings. Some of these date back to the 1700s, while others are more modern, built just 50 years ago. The entire village has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Public access to the area is prohibited for the time being.

The small village really took off when the Schuylkill Navigation Company built a 60-mile canal. The village was formerly known as Frick’s Locks because there once were two locks there. Before all the transportation options we have now – such as airplanes, trucks, and railroads – canals were the known as the best way to transport materials like coal from mines to factories. The canal made Frick’s Lock a vital part of trading in our area.

Editor’s Note: The Post thanks Spring-Ford High School student Katie Kelly for this bit of Limerick (PA) Township history. Katie aspires to be a writer and journalist; her mother, Beth, is a well-known photographer and marketing expert. Together they are producing historical notes for The Post, which are published on Wednesdays.

Photo by Beth Studt

POTTSTOWN PA – Residents of Limerick, Linfield, Royersford, Spring City, Trappe, Collegeville, Creamery, Kimberton and Phoenixville are among dozens of students who were named Monday (Jan. 25, 2011) to the Dean’s List for the fall 2010 semester at Montgomery County Community College.

South Hall on the West (Pottstown) campus of Montgomery County Community College.

South Hall on the West (Pottstown) campus of MCCC.

The Dean’s List recognizes the academic achievements of students who earned 12 or more cumulative credits and received a grade point average of 3.5 (of 4) or higher.

Among the honored are, in:

  • Limerick: Megan Bedard, Kylee Dea, Jessica DiFrancesco, Miranda Dombrosky, Brittany Fuller, Seth Howard, Tyler Little, Amanda Lozinak
  • Linfield: Stephen Calamia, Casey Hennessey
  • Royersford: Christina Barnshaw, Alexandria Bergmaier, Timothy Bergmaier, Lauren Breccia, Jennifer Callahan, Brett Clark, Carmen Colicino, Mark Cuevas, Michael Dyba, Chelsea Freeburn, Jonelle Green, Carolyn Hennessy, Julia Hoffman, Eric Marble, Adrianna Nicoline, Caitlin Norris, Josh Pindjak, Cassondra Sluszka, Hannah Thompson, Erin Walker, Sarah Wong
  • Spring City: Bryan Bankes, Nicholas Jensen, Leslie Proffitt, Jennifer Shaner, Corey Trego
  • Collegeville: Laura Allen, Lisa Bassett, Rebecca Beattie, Christopher Blegen, Gregory Boyd, Susan Brooks, Sarah Czochanski, Hannah Diemer, Thomas Dmochowski, Nancy Eisenhardt, Steven Entenman, Matthew Ford, Kaitlyn Franks, Timothy Fultz, Paul Goraczko, Robert Handzus, Dana Hoyer, Evan Hundertmark, Jessica Judyski, Jennifer Lamar, Hunter MacBain, Robert Maier, Austin Moyer, Christina Moyer, Gatrina Nolan, Emily Pigeon, Elizabeth Platchek, Heather Schultz, Samantha Schwartz, Andrew Shirley, Matthew Shirley, Jennifer Topham, Shelby Walter, Kyrsten Wilson, Krysti Yakonick
  • Creamery: Eric Nethery
  • Kimberton: Trever Dolan
  • Phoenixville: Liliana Avila Gamba, Rachel Beutler, Alexandra Dark, Steven Dewbrew, Victoria Eckman, Ashley Gadsden, Michelle Gaven, Hannah Keogh, Elizabeth McCarty, Carig Moritz, Thomas Mundy, Mary Odira, Kelsey Pacell, Lauren Quinn, Karen Vasko, Lauren Weimar
  • Trappe: Landon Hunsberger, Kellen Kissinger, Kyle Nolan, Courtney Schmidt

POTTSTOWN PA – If you’re among the more than 8 percent of greater Pottstown area residents now without a job, here are opportunities to get back into the hunt.

Montgomery County Community College will hold career fairs this spring at both its West Campus in Pottstown PA and its Central Campus in Blue Bell PA. The fairs are free, open to the public and will feature up to 20 area businesses and organizations looking to recruit for part-time, full-time, temporary and seasonal employment, as well as for internships.

Career fairs at the Pottstown campus are scheduled over three consecutive months, on Feb. 2, March 2 and April 6, all from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the main lobby of South Hall, 101 College Drive, Pottstown.

At the Blue Bell campus, similar fairs will be held Feb. 2, Feb. 3, March 1 and March 7, also from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the atrium of the Advanced Technology Center, 340 DeKalb Pike, Blue Bell. In addition, the college’s annual Spring Employment and Internship Expo, featuring up to 50 employers, will be held April 20 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in its Physical Education Center at Blue Bell.

Businesses and organizations that wish to participate in the career fairs should call Cindy Murphy in the college’s Office of Career Services, 610-718-1802, or e-mail her.

Photo from Google Images

By Katie Kelly
for The Limerick Post

ROYERSFORD PA – Many people have lived in Royersford their entire lives, and some still wonder:

Who discovered this town?

His name was Benjamin John Royer, and he was born 232 years ago last week (Jan. 3). He was a shoe-maker for Providence Township, who purchased 115 acres of land.

Editor’s Note: The Post thanks Spring-Ford High School student Katie Kelly for this bit of Limerick (PA) Township history. Katie aspires to be a writer and journalist; her mother, Beth, is a well-known photographer and marketing expert. Together they are producing historical notes for The Post, which will be published each Wednesday.

Photo by Beth Studt

POTTSTOWN PA – Before they attend even a single session this week to hear about future career choices, eighth grade students in the Spring-Ford, Pottsgrove, Pottstown, Owen J. Roberts, Boyertown, and Perkiomen Valley school districts have learned a valuable lesson about the working world:

It pays to be prepared.

The Western Montgomery County School-to-Work Partnership‘s two-day “Youth Career Leadership Conference,” at which hundreds of area students will be introduced to the careers of about 40 invited speakers, was to have begun this morning (Tuesday, Jan. 11, 2011). It’s already been postponed, a casualty of the snowstorm weather forecasters predict will hit the area beginning tonight and continuing through Wednesday.

With so many guests, and so much transit coordination needed between districts, the partnership thought it best to avoid complications and disruptions. So the conference has been shifted to alternative snow dates – the potential need for which was planned months ago – of Thursday and Friday (Jan. 14-15), beginning both days at 9 a.m. on the Pottstown campus of Montgomery County Community College.

The partnership is a self-sustaining group of business leaders, educators and other volunteers created 15 years ago to help show students the wide variety of job and career paths open to them. For many youths about to enter high school, its conference represents a real chance to start answering the question, “What do I want to do with the rest of my life?”

Surprisingly, given the area’s mercurial winters, the conference has never been postponed. “This is the first time in our history that we have had to utilize our snow dates,” organizers said in an e-mail distributed Monday (Jan. 10) to participants. “We realize … the decision is being made early; however, we feel this will be one less thing to worry about, especially if the storm arrives earlier than expected.”

Therein, of course, lies a lesson for those who will attend the conference. Their work lives will throw them curves, and they’ll need to be ready to adapt.

Professionals employed in all imaginable types of work are the guest speakers, and most seem able to change their schedules to fit the snow day shift. Students from each district (Spring-Ford eighth graders will be at Thursday’s sessions) get to choose four talks about careers that most appeal to them, and have their questions about them answered too. Both days will end with lunch.

Photo from Google Images

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