Real Estate


The Sanatoga interchange at U.S. Route 422.

LIMERICK PA – Adoption of an official road map for neighboring Limerick (PA) Township, being considered next week by the Limerick Board of Supervisors, may have an impact on future real estate development in Lower Pottsgrove.

The Limerick board, in an advertisement published Tuesday (Jan. 11, 2011) in The (Pottstown PA) Mercury newspaper, said it would conduct a public hearing and then consider a resolution to accept an official township road map during its Jan. 18 meeting at 7 p.m. in the municipal building, 646 W. Ridge Pike, Limerick PA. The meeting is open to the public.

The map, created by Limerick’s engineering firm, Pennoni Associates Inc., designates and reserves “areas for future streets, and other municipal facilities,” according to the published legal notice, and indicates “future street locations (and) intersection improvements within the Township.” It’s intended to give developers and land owners guidance by showing where and how Limerick looks to place roads and public utilities in coming years.

Likely to be included in the map are features affecting the development of properties on the Limerick side of the Sanatoga interchange at U.S. Route 422. Parts of the interchange are divided by the border line that separates Limerick and Lower Pottsgrove.

The two townships have collaborated since last year on creating a mutually acceptable, coordinated plan for real estate development at and around the interchange. Back in June (2010), both hired Norristown PA-based landscape architects Simone Collins to create detailed maps that show how road and other improvements on each side of the townships’ line would match up to enhance traffic flow and land use.

Consequently, the guidance offered by Limerick’s official map – if adopted as expected – for its western edge are known to and probably will be embraced by Lower Pottsgrove leaders. For future developers in Limerick, it locks much of that guidance into local law, as allowed under the Pennsylvania Municipalities Planning Code. Even so, the proposed road map ordinance gives supervisors the flexibility to change the design when a need arises.

Copies of the map and accompanying ordinance are available for public review, according to the legal notice, at Limerick’s municipal building, as well as at the offices of The Mercury, Hanover and King Streets, Pottstown PA; and at the Montgomery County Law Library, located in the lower level of the county courthouse in Norristown.

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LIMERICK PA – We’re not alone.

No, this isn’t about life on other worlds, but it does reference something almost everyone wishes was just as alien … taxes.

Limerick (PA) Township supervisors, with the infusion of a hefty amount of savings, have announced they will avoid raising property taxes next year. Some surrounding and nearby municipalities accomplished that feat, too:  Lower Pottsgrove, Upper Pottsgrove, New Hanover, and East Coventry among them. Others haven’t been as fortunate.

To offer some perspective on what area municipalities are facing, consider these:

  • Limerick dips into reserve fund to avoid tax hike (Pottstown PA Mercury)
    Limerick (PA) Township officials have decided to use more than three-quarters of a million dollars in reserve funding to keep the $13.7 million township 2011 budget from requiring a tax hike next year.
  • Royersford budget proposal would increase taxes 17.5% (Pottstown PA Mercury)
    Royersford (PA) Borough property taxes would increase by more than 17.5 percent under the draft $3.4 million budget Borough Council was due to review Nov. 30. Manager Michael Leonard said the 1 mill tax hike being contemplated is due largely to the necessity of making up a $400,000 hole in the budget.
  • Sewer rates to go up 11% while taxes stay same (Pottstown PA Mercury)
    Although property taxes will not increase in the $1.6 million tentative budget on which the Spring City (PA) Borough Council is expected to vote, anyone who flushes a toilet will pay about $40 more per year starting in July.
  • Pottstown Borough Budget Meeting (Roy’s Rants)
    Pottstown (PA) Borough
    Council on Tuesday (Nov. 30, 2010) unanimously approved the 2011 tentative budget with a 3.1-percent tax increase. The increase equates to $25.66 per year on a home assessed at $85,000. A $177,000 deficit makes this necessary. Final budget numbers could change with further cost-cutting or asset sales.
    • Pottstown Authority increases base fee for water by 40% (Pottstown PA Mercury)
      The base rate that water customers pay, no matter how much water they use, will increase by 40 percent under the $5.9 million water budget adopted in a 3-1 vote by the Pottstown Borough Authority. The current base rate is $25 per quarter. Under the adopted budget that will increase to $35 per quarter or $140 per year.
    • Upper Pottsgrove holding line on taxes for 2011 (Pottstown PA Mercury)
      There will be no property tax hike or increase in sewer rates under the 2011 budget adopted by Upper Pottsgrove (PA) Township commissioners. If unchanged, it will be the second consecutive year that the township has adopted a budget with no tax increases.
    • Residents don’t want police cuts in budget (Pottstown PA Mercury)
      It was standing-room-only inside Phoenixville (PA) Borough Hall as law enforcement officials and residents came out in full force to inform Borough Council of their support for local police. The council’s finance committee asked the police department to trim its budget by $200,000, which could mean the potential loss of two officers.
    • No property tax hike in new East Coventry budget proposal (Pottstown PA Mercury)
      The 2011 budget presented to the East Coventry (PA) Township Board of Supervisors does not call for a property tax increase; however, working people in town will see a bigger bite out of their paychecks as a result of an open space referendum passed in the general election.
    • Amity considers sewage fee increase (Community-Buzz.com)
      Amity (PA) Township supervisors approved advertising their new budget, which required $140,000 from the general fund to make up for a shortfall. They also considered, but did not act on, a sewage fee increase of $5 a quarter to generate additional money for the sewer fund.

    The AAA East Penn location at 95 S. Hanover St, Pottstown.

    ROYERSFORD PA – A new Travel and Insurance Store operated by AAA East Penn is scheduled to open Dec. 6 (2010; Monday) at 10 a.m. in the Limerick Square Shopping Center, 70 Buckwalter Rd., Royersford PA, the organization announced last week in its November-December 2011 newsletter.

    The store offers improved access, additional parking spaces, a conference room for travel and driver safety presentations, and a larger area in which to display travel-related products. Opening of the Royersford location, however, also means the organization’s Pottstown store will officially close Dec. 3 (Friday) at 5 p.m., according to the newsletter’s front-page article.

    A grand opening observance for the Royersford store is scheduled for March 10-12, 2011.

    Hours of operation in Royersford will by 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays; 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays; and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays. These hours differ from those in Pottstown, the article noted.

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    POTTSTOWN PA – Continental Bank, which operates a branch office in Limerick PA and is headquartered in Plymouth Meeting PA, has named Joseph A. Trianosky as its vice president of commercial real estate, it announced Oct. 6 (2010).

    Trianosky, of Pottstown PA, formerly worked as vice president and relationship manager for commercial real estate and construction lending customers at First Niagara. Earlier, he was with Mellon Bank as assistant vice president and relationship manager, primarily serving customers in the New England and Atlanta, Georgia regions.

    Trianosky holds a Bachelor of Science degree in real estate from Pennsylvania State University and an MBA in finance from Temple University.

    Continental Bank is a $495 million community bank with 10 locations that was formed in September 2005.

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    They paid how much?

    They paid how much?

    LIMERICK PA – The top price for real estate sold within Limerick (PA) Township from April 8-June 24, 2010, came in at $415,000, the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper reports. The property is located at 24 Pine Tree Dr.

     

    Also listed were:

    • 46 Boraten Rd., at $410,500; and
    • 55 N. Township Line Rd., $370,000.

    This week’s top reported prices were listed Sunday (Oct. 10, 2010) in “The Top 50,” the newspaper’s weekly review of highest prices paid for homes sold within the city of Philadelphia and townships in its surrounding counties.

    By contrast, during the same period, the top real estate sales price in Royersford PA Borough, immediately to the southeast, was $190,000; Lower Pottsgrove PA Township, southwest, $205,000; Upper Providence PA Township, east, $582,000; Perkiomen PA Township, northeast, $240,000; Lower Frederick PA Township, north, $373,450; Upper Frederick PA Township, northwest, none listed; and in New Hanover PA Township, west, $340,000.

    Across all of Montgomery County, the highest-priced property sold during the period went for $1,925,000, at 1862 Aloha Ln., Lower Merion PA.

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    They paid how much?

    They paid how much?


    LIMERICK PA – The top price for real estate sold within Limerick (PA) Township from April 1-June 28, 2010, came in at $360,000, the Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper reports. The property is located at 1103 Sun Valley Dr.

    Also listed were:

    • 64 Major Rd., $340,000; and
    • 1101 Foxmeadow Dr. Bdlg 11, $164,000.

    This week’s top reported prices were listed Sunday (Oct. 3, 2010) in “The Top 50,” the newspaper’s weekly review of highest prices paid for homes sold within the city of Philadelphia and townships in its surrounding counties.

    By contrast, during the same period, the top real estate sales price in Royersford PA Borough, immediately to the southeast, was $160,000; Lower Pottsgrove PA Township, southwest, none listed; Upper Providence PA Township, east, $487,500; Perkiomen PA Township, northeast, none listed; Lower Frederick PA Township, north, none listed; Upper Frederick PA Township, northwest, none listed; and in New Hanover PA Township, west, $132,100.

    Across all of Montgomery County, the highest-priced property sold during the period went for $1,345,000, at 394 Old Gulph Rd., Lower Merion PA.

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    CREAMERY PA – Registrations are still being accepted for “A Morning in the Garden with Master Gardeners,” a one-day series of nine classes being taught in three one-hour sessions by master gardeners from Penn State Extension of Montgomery County on Oct. 23 from 9 a.m. to Noon at the Cooperative Extension Office on Route 113 in Creamery PA, about a mile south of Skippack.

    Participants can enroll for classes in any or all of three sessions:

    • Backyard Habitat, Seed Starting, or Gardening for Planet Earth, at 9 a.m.;
    • Using Natives to Attract Birds and Wildlife, Composting, or Ground Covers, 10 a.m.; and
    • Putting the Garden to Bed, Using Your Harvested Herbs, or Butterfly Identification, 11 a.m.

    Advance registration is required. Costs vary depending on the number of sessions desired. For more information or to receive a brochure, call 610-489-4315.

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